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Rolling down my garden is moving

As of June, 2022 Rolling down my garden will be moving to its own side: https://rollingdownmygarden.com Full new posts can be read on the new page.

We've been busy at rollingdownmygarden new page

 New posts on https://rollingdownmygarden.com


1) Apple harvest: compote and dehydrated apples  08/23/2022

2) Lazy Sunday lunch: All-in-one pot  08/21/2022

3) Garden diary: still dealing with drought  08/19/2022

4) Mini buhtle: sweet jam and chocolate buns 08/14/2022

5) Pasta with cabbages-krpice sa zeljem 08/10/2022

6) Watering the overheated garden: When and how 08/08/2022

7) Garden diary:late summer sowing 08/03/2022

8) Blackberries: how to store them for winter 07/31/2022

9) Garden diary: July side garden progress 07/29/2022

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Mama bear has had enough

This has been a really difficult year for the seedlings and potted vegetables. The beginning of the spring was very cold, which didn't allow our seedlings to grow as they should. After the cold, came unusually warm months, and we've now been in the summer mood for almost 2 months. The seedlings did enjoy the warmth, but now it's becoming a problem since the normal growing places are just too warm, and we need to find our plants a new spot. I already wrote about the moving of the seedlings to the cooler parts of the yard, and now it's time to talk about chili peppers. Chili peppers, like brassica greens and seedlings, are grown in pots... Read more here As of June 2022, Rolling down my garden will be moving to its own side:  https://rollingdownmygarden.com Full new posts can be read on the new page.

New posts on rollingdownmygarden page

  As of June 2022, Rolling down my garden will be moving to its own side:  https://rollingdownmygarden.com Full new posts can be read on the new page: 1) Cucamelon: A small taste bomb 2)Garden diary: A slow hot week 3)Blossom end rot: what can we do about it? 4)A cold week in July 5) Dealing with cracks in soil 6) Zucchinis: eating the whole plant

Storing red currants for winter

 June is red currant time. Like all berries, currants don't ripe all at the same time, so they can be hard to store for winter. The usual way of storing them is to freeze them in bags or processed them in juice, syrup, or jam. I used to store my red currants this way before. But, since I still have plenty of juice and jam left from previous years, I decided to try some other ways of storing these delicious berries. The red currant bush in my garden has been here for over 20 years. It's not a big bush, but it still produces nice amounts of berries, depending on the weather conditions of course. Last year was a bad one and all my currants froze in the early stages of fruit forming. This year there was no frost danger and all of the berries grew fine. I've been harvesting them every couple of days. Just the amount that I can store. Red currants can stay on the bush for a long time and not rot or spoil. As I said earlier, I wanted to try new ways of storing berrie